Brainwash

Brainwash

The Secret History of Mind Control

Book - 2007
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"What would it take to turn "you" into a suicide bomber? "


"How would" you" interrogate a member of Al Qaeda?"


With access to formerly classified documentation and interviews from the CIA, the U.S. Army, MI5, MI6, and the British Intelligence Corps, acclaimed journalist Dominic Streatfeild traces the history of the world's most secret psychological procedure.


From the cold war to the height of today's war on terror, groups as dissimilar as armies, religious cults, and advertising agencies have been accused of brainwashing. But what does this mean?


Is it possible to erase memories or to implant them artificially? Do heavy-metal records contain subliminal messages? Do religious cults brainwash recruits? What were the CIA and MI6 doing with LSD in the 1950s? How far have the world's militaries really gone?


From the author of the definitive history of cocaine, """Brainwash" is required reading in an era of cutting-edge and often controversial interrogation practices. More than just an examination of the techniques used by the CIA, the KGB, and the Taliban, """it" is also a gripping, full history of the heated efforts to master the elusive, secret techniques of mind control.

Publisher: New York, N.Y. : Thomas Dunne Books, 2007.
Edition: 1st U.S. ed.
ISBN: 9780312325725
031232572X
Branch Call Number: 153.853
153.8/53 22
BF633 .S87 2007
Characteristics: 418 p. ; 25 cm.

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" When THE SEARCH FOR THE MANCHURIAN CANDIDATE was published, the U.S. was in a quiet panic about brainwashing. the Moonies and the Children of God were recruiting all around the country. 912 people had committed suicide at Jonestown in Guyana. Manson had persuaded his 'family' to murder 7 prominent people in Southern California. Patty Hearst was turned into a bank robber, by the Symbionese Liberation Army." "In early april 1953, the U.S. ambassador to the U.N., Senator Henry Cabot Lodge, met with a pair of C.I.A. officers." "the MIAMI DAILY NEWS' Edward Hunter, was a salaried propagandist for the C.I.A..it was he who coined the term, 'brainwashing.'" "from the mid-1930s Estabrooks bombarded politicians, and military -intelligence staff with his plans to use hypnosis as a weapon. those with whom he shared his thoughts included William Donovan of the OSS, J. Edgar Hoover of the FBI, the u.s. marine corps, the department of naval intelligence, the british embassy in Washington, and Winston Churchill." " following the defection of Kim Philby in 1963, James Angleton became convinced that the C.I.A. had been penetrated at a high level, and that defector Nosenko's refusal to speak was part of ' the monster plot': a vast soviet conspiracy to infiltrate and undermine the entire Western intelligence network. 'those who said that nosenko was exactly who he said he was, lost their positions, and the C.I.A. began to tear itself to pieces.'" under MKULTRA, Frank Olson defenestrated from the 10th floor of the Statler Hotel in New York City. this program was run by Sidney Gottlieb. 11 months earlier, a man had been od-ed by a similar program. The doctor who injected him said he was told by the U.S. Army to, and that as far as he knew, he had injected the man with ' dog piss.' it was actually a derivitave of mescaline, As I said, the man died, without ever having given permission for the procedure (he didn't volunteer to die).

3
3romm3la
Mar 12, 2015

Very interesting book, however, I found the Epilogue weak. After all the research the author presented proving that these coercive techniques were of no use, his Epilogue presents several examples of military/intelligence officers claiming otherwise. The author asks the reader whether they would use these techniques in the hypothetical "ticking time bomb" scenario, but after reading the book, how could anyone respond with anything but "No"?
I also had a minor issue with the chapter about the Ingram case. The author holds the Ingram sisters as proof that children are capable of lying about sexual abuse. However, the Ingram sisters were not children when they came up with their unbelievable story. Ericka was 22 and Julie 18. I also believe children are capable of lying, but if you're going to use an example use one that applies.

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