Keane

Keane

DVD - 2006
Average Rating:
7
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While searching for his missing 6-year-old daughter, a man meets a young woman and her daughter.
Publisher: Los Angeles, CA : distributed by Magnolia Home Entertainment, [2006]
Branch Call Number: Fic
Characteristics: 1 videodisc (ca. 94 min.) : sd., col. ; 4 3/4 in.

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n
Nursebob
Mar 21, 2017

In the title role Damian Lewis is nothing short of brilliant. Avoiding the wild hysterics often associated with the portrayal of mentally ill characters he instead turns in an amazingly nuanced performance which relies as much on facial expressions and shadowed stares as physical exertion. Keane is not a sympathetic character by any stretch and as the camera follows his every move, much like an unwelcome stalker, we are alternately fascinated, saddened and repulsed by his actions. Unfortunately, ninety minutes of unhinged ramblings and drug-fueled non-sequiturs prove to be more exhausting than gripping, rather like watching a perpetual car crash in slow motion. Even the occasional insights into Keane’s troubled past do little to pierce through the film’s deliberate opacity. As a character study it should prove of some interest to psychology majors but for the rest of us its lack of momentum and psychotic repetitiveness is ultimately frustrating.

j
Janice21383
Dec 31, 2016

Keane is a difficult film to recommend, because it doesn't have the attractions we usually look for in film. There is no well-defined story, no obvious directorial "point of view"; and as far as extras like interesting sets or powerful music, forget about it. And there is basically only one character, but what a character: Damian Lewis is a schizophrenic who searches for his little daughter, who may or may not exist. Events unfold as they might in real life, with a depth that may only become apparent in retrospect.

n
Nursebob
Dec 18, 2014

When we first meet William Keane he is frantically searching for Sophie, his nine-year-old daughter who was abducted from a bus station earlier on. At first it is easy to feel concern and empathy for his plight as he is brushed off by station officials and passersby alike but his increasingly irrational behaviour quickly causes us to realize that this is a very deeply disturbed man. Constantly self-medicating himself with alcohol and cocaine, a practice leading to frequent violent outbursts, Keane is ill-prepared to care for himself let alone find a missing child. In fact, as we listen to his ceaseless manic monologue rife with guilty references and paranoid fixations we begin to doubt the veracity of his claims; indeed the only “evidence” he has of little Sophie’s existence is an old newspaper article that may or may not be about her. But when Keane forms a tentative bond with a single mother living in the same fleabag hotel his relationship with her daughter, a young girl roughly the same age and size as the elusive Sophie, carries both the promise of salvation as he struggles to lay some demons to rest, and the threat of tragedy as he refuses to lose his daughter a second time. In the title role Damian Lewis is nothing short of brilliant. Avoiding the wild hysterics often associated with the portrayal of mentally ill characters he instead turns in an amazingly nuanced performance which relies as much on facial expressions and shadowed stares as physical exertion. Keane is not a sympathetic character by any stretch and as the camera follows his every move, much like an unwelcome stalker, we are alternately fascinated, saddened and repulsed by his actions. Unfortunately, ninety minutes of unhinged ramblings and drug-fueled non-sequiturs prove to be more exhausting than gripping, rather like watching a perpetual car crash in slow motion. Even the occasional insights into Keane’s troubled past do little to pierce through the film’s deliberate opacity. As a character study it should prove of some interest to psychology majors but for the rest of us its lack of momentum and psychotic repetitiveness is ultimately frustrating.

voisjoe1 May 15, 2013

“Keane,” directed by Lodge Kerrigan and starring Damian Lewis is the story of Keane, who suffers from psychosis and he may have lost a young daughter at a train depot. Keane obsessively tries to re-enact the scenes in which his daughter became lost in the hopes that somehow this will help him find her. This is one of the best cinematic portrayals of mental disorder that I have ever seen. Kerrigan makes only two films per decade. “Claire Dolan,” another film by Kerrigan, was one of the coldest and intense movies that I have ever seen, at least for the first 40 minutes (after 40 minutes I had to stop the DVD to take a breather). Kerrigan chooses difficult characters that other directors try to avoid. His works are supported by Steven Soderberg, the great movie producer and director.

btmslt Aug 24, 2012

This film tries to explore the mind of a mentally dysfunctional individual but is not very sucessful at all. It ends up being a rather tedious work.

e
Ellington4
Feb 02, 2012

A movie that takes you emotionally into the mind of a schizophrenic, who is fighting to be normal. Damien Lewis gives a mezmerising and unforgettable performance. The extraordinary Abigail Breslin, at age 8, makes you want to hug and protect her. A memorable movie.

d
dschan
Aug 15, 2011

First 30 minutes is of Keane wandering around asking everyone if they had seen his daughter, who disappeared several months ago. I'm not kidding, 30 minutes of a guy wandering and acting psycho. How about just a little bit of plot development to keep viewers interested? I figured out after 5 minutes the guy is desperate to find his daughter, I dont need 30 minutes of boredom.

Turned it off after 30 minutes.

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